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Holodeck - Music Is The Soundtrack Of Your Life

Posted March 2, 2021, 4:19 p.m. by Lieutenant Kiama Naim (Chief Science Officer) (Silke Fahl)

Posted by Captain Alexander Cochrane (Commanding Officer) in Holodeck - Music Is The Soundtrack Of Your Life

Posted by Lieutenant Kiama Naim (Chief Science Officer) in Holodeck - Music Is The Soundtrack Of Your Life

Posted by Captain Alexander Cochrane (Commanding Officer) in Holodeck - Music Is The Soundtrack Of Your Life
Posted by… suppressed (7) by the Post Ghost! 👻

(snip)

Alex smiled. “Good. Press a little harder here and here…” and he moved her fingers so they were placed correctly, “… yeah. Now, try it. Don’t be shy… strum all the way through.”

Cochrane, CO

“Okay,” Kiama nodded and then strummed the strings again. it sounded better than the first time. But at least one of her fingers was touching the neighbouring string lightly as well, so it still sounded a little off. She could tell that she was still touching more strings than she should. So with a deep frown on her face she concentrated on what she was doing, she adjusted her fingers slightly and tried again. It still didn’t sound quite right and she exhaled with a soft sigh.

~Lt. Naim, CSO

Alex chuckled. “What? You expected to be B.B. King on your first time?” and he smiled at her. “Here, that’s try something that may fit your stature more.” and he reached for the guitar.

“No, I didn’t,” Kiama laughed. “I’m certainly impulsive and I can be naive and impatient. But I dare say that I’m not stupid, or arrogant enough to believe something should work perfectly the first time I try it. But I can still wish it would be easier for me to keep my fingers on only one string each, no?” she continued with a mock pout as she handed Alex the guitar.

=/\=Computer. One violin. =/\= and there appeared a violin on a stand next to them. Alex picked it up, tuned it, and then showed Kiama how to brace it and where to put her finger. He handed her the bow and said “Now. Your fingers are set for A. Draw the bow across the strings in a smooth, even motion back and forth.”

Cochrane, CO

Somehow the violin felt more natural as it rested on her shoulder than the guitar had on her lap. Making sure to brace it as Alex had shown her, Kiama started to draw the bow gently back and forth across the strings. She tried to do so in an even motion as he had instructed her, but wasn’t sure how well she managed that. It didn’t sound great, but it also didn’t sound as horrible as she had feared that it might.

~Lt. Naim, CSO

“Nice… yeah…” Alex said as she continued to move the bow back and forth. “So the guitar makes sound through strumming or plucking strings. Those sounds are changed by pressure on the frets and distance from the body, and by bending strings and or sliding pressure. The violin works much the same way, but no frets. And here is where it gets tricky. You can do all that stuff from the guitar on the violin, but now you also have the bow. Depending on the angleis what strings you are using, and the pressure or lack there of will change your tone and pitch. Sounds harder than it is, really. Just play around with it, get used to the feel. You don’t have to ‘play’ anything right away. Just listen to the instrument and let it tell you what to do.”

Cochrane, CO

You can do this.

A soft smile played across Kiama’s face. She knew that her first attempt surely wasn’t great, but it didn’t seem to be horrible either and she would definitely take that as a win so to speak. Though without noticing it, she stopped moving the bow as she listened to Alex’ explanation and nodded a few times. What he said made perfect sense to her. And apart from music being something she considered beautiful, she also loved the science and maths behind it. It made everything not only logical but in a way easy to handle and understand. At least for her. “That makes sense,” Kiama nodded. “And the thinner and shorter a string is, the higher is the note I’m playing and vice versa, correct?” she asked as she placed the bow on the strings again and started to play around a little with where she placed her fingers, the pressure she was using and the angle of the bow. Sometimes it sounded okay. A few times even good. But there were also moments when she produced a rather awful screeching noise and winced involuntarily. Each time that happened she apologised and tried to remember what she had just done so that she wouldn’t do it again.

~Lt. Naim, CSO

Alex smiled as she played around on the violin, and even laughed at the wincing sounds. “Thats okay! Perfectly okay. It happens. And at first the more you try, the more it will happen. But that is just part of it. Just remember that you are going to make mistakes, and those mistakes can be just as beautiful as the rest, okay? Its a rocess… a journey. Try and think about it like this: When you were a child, did it ever occur to you that you would be here? In charge of all the research on the largest science vessel in the history of Starfleet? In the Delta Quadrant, of all places? No… but… here you are. You took the step at the beginning, and now you have arrivedat this part of your journey. Music… Music is the same. Right here, you just took the first step. Who knows where it may lead? But to find out, you have to keep traveling.”

Cochrane, CO

Kiama nodded and joined in when Alex laughed. He was right, of course. And it felt liberating to be able to make mistakes and being told that it was okay. After all, between her mother and her own perfectionist nature, allowing herself to make mistakes was not something that came easy to her. Despite the fact that she knew that mistakes are normal and the way you learn. “How do I learn and remember where which note is and all that? On the guitar it seems fairly simple as you just need to count frets. But there isn’t really anything to guide me when it comes to the violin.

~Lt. Naim, CSO

Alex nodded and said “Good question, and the answer is muscle memory. Try this, may I?” and he reached out for the instrument.

“Of course,” Kiama replied as she handed Alex the violin.

Taking it and putting it in place, he said “Highest note.” and played a long, continuous note. Moving his fingers down the neck, he said “Lowest note.” and repeated the same action, this time with a low almost rumble. “So then you just practice doing this.” and he began to play scales… up and down and back again. Stopping, he handed the violin back to her. “That’s how.”

Cochrane, CO

“So practice, practice, practice,” Kiama smiled and placed the violin back on her shoulder again. “That makes sense. Let’s just hope I remember the right positions for my fingers and the bow,” she added as she placed her fingers on the strings again. She tried to copy what Alex had just done, but more than once the placement of her fingers wasn’t correct. Sometimes she could tell that she was off. But other times she couldn’t.

~Lt. Naim, CSO


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