Security

Andrew Robinson

Revision History
Revision 3 5 May 2012

Remove course proctor name from exam body.

Revision 2 16 February 2009

Course proctor changed to Wail Qasim

Revision 1 15 November 2005

Rewritten by Andrew Robinson


Table of Contents

Introduction
What Is A Security Officer
What Does A Security Officer Know?
Weapons
Introduction
Hand
Heavy
Grenades
Armour
How Combat Works In STF
Brief Introduction To Turn Based Combat
Turn Based Role Playing Starfleet Style
One Final Word To The Wise
Other Branches Of The Service
Marines
Intelligence
Tactical Officers
A Final Caution
Don't Go Overboard
Never Go Beyond Canon
Be Aware Of Your Ship Class
Exam
Section One (Worth a Total of 10 Marks)
Section Two (Worth a Total of 40 Marks)
Section Three (Worth a Total of 20 Marks)
Section Four (Worth a Total of 20 Marks)
Section Five (Worth a Total of 30 Marks)
Section Six (Worth a Total of 20 Marks)
Final Question (Worth a Total of 30 Marks)

Introduction

Welcome to the star-fleet.com Security Academy course. Whether you've never even seen a phaser or you've fought in more combat actions than Sherman, this course is for you. It is designed to introduce you to all aspects of Security, both In Character and Out Of Character, and more importantly how to conduct combat operations within the STF framework. Additionally it will give you a brief rundown of the weapons and equipment available to a Starfleet Security Officer.

My name is Andrew Robinson and I joined STF In October 2004. Since then I've held the position of Chief Of Security for Outpost 42, The U.S.S Genesis, and the Scottie Testing Centre, three distinct environments in which to experience the same position.

What Is A Security Officer

So how do you go about playing a Security Officer successfully? Well the answer to that question lies in explaining what exactly a Security Officer is.

A Security Officer is Diplomat, Policeman, Warrior and Peace Keeper. It is not the job of Starfleet Security to romp about the galaxy blowing the enemies of justice to hell. It is vital that you remember that the primary role of the Security Officer is preventative in 99% of cases. If it comes to combat you've likely done something wrong somewhere.

The particular stations that each individual officer will hold are largely dependant upon the environment in which they are stationed:

  • Starbases: Starbase Security Officers are the true Policemen of the trade, spending virtually all of their time patrolling sectors, handling the mundane matters of Security Administration and preventing or investigating crimes, both big and small. Obviously on a station such as Starbase 1 you will have virtually no crime at all, and you'll spend most of your time looking pretty and standing still. However on the frontier outposts such as Outpost 42 in Fleet 3, Outpost 45 in Fleet 2 and OED V in Fleet 6 you are distinctly more likely to come across crime. You'll even spend time creating some of your own arrests, particularly during character development stages. Having served as Chief Of Security for Outpost 42 myself I can assure you its certainly interesting work for a Security Officer to undertake.

  • Science Vessels: I'll warn you now that serving aboard a Science Vessel can be damnably boring work, and it takes a special kind of player to be able to successfully portray a Security Officer on a vessel like this. You will spend the majority of your time, even during a sim, writing posts that show you training, performing various mundane tasks such as patrolling areas, standing guard, performing Brig duty and running emergency action drills. A science vessel post isn't for everyone, and when the action does arrive, as it inevitably will once the weenies have had their fun you'll need to be prepared to handle whatever your de Sade wannabe GM may throw at you. Science vessel Security Officers will be given the opportunity to really exercise their diplomatic muscles, particularly when it comes to missions involving other cultures where you will be expected to guard your shipmates whilst not offending your hosts.

  • Combat Vessels: There has been a lot of debate as to the inclusion of combat vessels in STF, but I think anyone who has ever served on one will agree, they are quite possibly the most fun you can have with your clothes on. Combat Vessel Security Officers will have access to the best equipment, the best armour and weapons that Starfleet can provide, because nine times out of ten they'll need to use them. Frontline vessels such as the Draco in Fleet 5, the Atlantis in Fleet 3, the Endeavour in Fleet 5, and others will almost always receive combat related sims. But! And there is certainly a But here, this is actually not necessarily the kind of ship on which you spend your time firing phasers and hitting the dirt with photon mortars. You will spend your time on a Combat Vessel carefully balancing your innate desires as keepers of the peace against the potential combat situations in which you will find yourself.

What Does A Security Officer Know?

I have to say, I've seen it all when it comes to Security Characters: some that will make your sides split with their eccentric ways, some that make you pull your hair out in frustration, and some that are just damn peculiar.

Security is the single biggest position in STF that receives its share of nut cases. It seems to be very hard for people to create Security characters that aren't all powerful with a mastery of every single martial art that ever existed, perfect aim with a phaser and the ability to carry nine wounded comrades thirty miles to an evac. point. Believe me on this, I'm not kidding, I've seen it done.

When you create your character bear in mind the following as you write your backstory:

  • Once a cadet enters Starfleet Academy they will spend two years learning the general studies that every officer in Starfleet is familiar with, including the basics of each field (Engineering, Security, Science and Medical), which will get each of them up to an equal standard of learning. Towards the end of the second year a cadet will be asked to choose their field. All fields within Starfleet fall under one of the four major groups; Engineering, Science, Medical and Security. For the remaining two years in the Academy each cadet will receive advanced training in the discipline of their choice.

  • What you need to remember is that during those last two years a Cadet will focus on Security and Security only, so whilst it's permitted in the Academy to minor in an unrelated topic it would be almost impossible to find a Security Officer with a minor in Medical Nanotechnology. When you create your character you must think carefully about what you want them to know.

  • Contrary to popular belief, the standard Starfleet martial art is not in fact the Klingon art of Mok'Bara, which was something that Worf taught the officers and crew of the Enterprise. The Martial Art taught in the Academy draws upon a wide range of styles from Earth and other cultures brought together in the 24th century style of anbo-jytsu/anbo jyutsu, the ultimate way of the staff. More information on this can be found through Google.

  • The Security Officer, dependant upon their final field, will be required to learn advanced tactics and weaponry, small ship piloting, anti terrorist tactics, small combat unit combat practices, Starship weaponry and tactics, as well as military history and field practices which include semesters covering basic combat triage, weapon maintenance and repair and survival. This is by no means a definitive list, and no Security Officer will know all of these backwards, forwards and inside out. There will be a general smattering of knowledge, but some of these are more particular to Marines and Intelligence Officers.

Weapons

Introduction

We now move on to the section that tends to hold peoples interest significantly more than the others. It's worth noting that whilst you will likely refer back to this weapons list you will probably never use any weapons IC beyond those listed in the hand weapons section.

There are a number of weapons in use in Starfleet, some that have been almost fully explained down to full technical specifications and some that have been given only passing reference.

Always bear in mind that the standard equipment issued to any Security Officer are tricorder and type II phaser, and most vessels carry nothing larger than compression phaser rifles. Combat oriented vessels will obviously carry larger and more varied stocks, but the chances of you being issued with Armour and photon mortars are minimal to say the least.

It's also worth mentioning that whilst your Character might have a lovely collection of antique weaponry from dozens of cultures including sniper rifles, Bat'Leth's Mek'Leth's and dozens of other nifty little trinkets, you will *never* get to wear them or use them except in some pretty damned extreme situations. It makes good character backstory for a Security Officer to have a collection such as that, but you're a Starfleet Officer not a Klingon warrior. NOTE: This doesn't preclude you indulging in Worf's happy pastime of practicing with these weapons on the holodeck. It makes for some rather excellent posting threads.

Hand

Type 1f Personal Phaser

This weapon has 4 settings. The Type If, due to its extra power availability provided by a slightly larger Sarium Krellide power cell, is the standard 'back up' sidearm for Starfleet Security personnel, including the Marines. This weapon is issued to away teams when having weapons visible could be detrimental to the mission. This weapon has an additional Sarium Krellide power cell embedded into the centre section giving it the ability to function for longer periods than the older type 1e. As with any sidearm, the main four beam types are Stun, Heat, Heavy Stun and Disrupt. This weapon is often treated as a covert weapon, and many officers over the years have decided that it is fun to stick one in their boot. It is fun until the phaser goes off and they end up in sickbay. Remember weapons handling and training is the Star-fleet way : Just like the modern military.

Type II Personal Phaser

This weapon has 16 Individual settings, each controlling the amount of damage capable of being inflicted to a greater degree than the type 1f. The Type II Phaser is the standard issue weapon for any away team and can be augmented with extra power cells should the need arise.

Type IIIa Phaser Rifle

When Starfleet Security or away teams need more firepower than a side arm they turn to the Phaser rifle. The Type-III is significantly more powerful than the Type II Phaser, in fact being little more than a power booster, though incorporating one or two extras. The Type III includes an effective targeting system and is equipped with a gyro-stabilized targeting unit. This targeting unit incorporates sensors capable of detecting and tracking life forms. The Type III has been phased out in recent years and has been relegated to an Academy training aid. Academy Starships carry a small supply of these aboard, usually stored aboard small auxiliary craft and in auxiliary weapon lockers.

Power: Enlarged Sarium Krellide power cell

Power consumption: 325 watts per shot

Casing: Tritanium Outer Shell

Effective Range: 400 m

Settings: 16 Variable Power

Type IIIb Phaser Rifle

Following first contact with the Borg a Starfleet Borg Tactical Analysis Unit was established at Starbase 324 and one of its first creations was the Type IIIb rifle. Utilising an advanced computer control matrix it was the first weapon specifically designed to rotate its power frequencies to combat the Borg. Since the advent of pulse compression and isometric technology this weapon has been phased out of active service and is rarely seen outside of a museum.

Power: Enlarged Sarium Krellide power cell.

Power consumption: 350 watts per shot

Casing: Tritanium Outer Shell

Effective Range: 500 m

Settings: 16

Type IIIc Pulse Compression Phaser Rifle

The current primary weapon in active Starfleet service, the Type IIIc uses pulse compression technology in conjunction with plasma accelerator systems to project toroidal plasma bursts at a significantly faster muzzle velocity than previous weapons. This allows significant increases in power level, facilitating greater frequency modulation capabilities. Pulse Compression rifles utilise biometric control systems and advanced targeting sensor systems capable of tracking and firing through solid objects. This rifle is a perfect multi purpose weapon that presents the first sustained fire pulse weapon in Starfleet's arsenal since the Plasma rifles of the early 22nd Century.

TR-116 Projectile Rifle

An experimental weapon developed by Starfleet Security, it fires tritanium projectiles propelled by expanding gases from a chemical detonation. This rifle was designed for use in areas of high electromagnetic (EM) interference (whether artificial or natural) that would render phasers useless, and as a potential alternative to energy weapons whilst engaging in combat with the Borg. The Weapon was never mass produced and became little more than a collector's item with no practical purpose that could be justified sufficiently for large scale production. One unique aspect of this weapon is its Exographic Targeting System, a separate sighting device which communicates with the weapon via a subspace transceiver link. The operator wears a wire frame helmet with a monocle attached over one eye, and moves a trackball (mounted on both sides of the weapon, making it ambidextrous) located on the rifle to zoom in to the target. The magazine is contained in the forward handgrip under the barrel, being removed by releasing a catch aft of the trigger guard and sliding it forward. In 2375, one of these rifles was modified on Deep Space Nine with a micro-transporter connected near the barrel exit. The rifle dematerialized the bullet after firing and rematerialized it just in front of the target, and could possibly have done it inside the victim. The person responsible, a traumatized Vulcan officer, murdered several Starfleet personnel before being wounded by another modified TR-116 and taken into custody. NOTE: The chances of this weapon being carried as standard issue on any vessel are NONEXISTANT. It was never mass produced. It may make an interesting character twist for an officer to have one as a keepsake of sorts, but your COS is highly unlikely to let you use it on a mission, so restrict it to the same place as Worf's Bat'leth, on the wall of your quarters.

Type IIId Pulse Compression Phaser Rifle - EVA Variant

This weapon is identical in terms of specification to the Type IIIc with the exception of a specially adapted grip and trigger system designed to accommodate the bulk of EVA suits.

Heavy

Mark I Photon Mortar

Primarily a large scale infantry weapon *not* carried on non combat oriented vessels, this launcher is designed to fire high powered photon grenades up to 40,000 metres.

Mass: 3.2 kg (fully loaded)

Length: 40 cm

Capacity: Standard Clip holds 10 grenades.

Note: This weapon is limited in availability and use to wartime conditions or extreme combat zones and will be stocked only as mission conditions require.

Isomagnetic Disintegrator

This shoulder mounted weapon is issued to the Armouries of combat and deep exploratory vessels only. Utilising mammoth capacity power cells and larger pulse compression technology this weapon is capable of projecting a toroidal plasma charge powerful enough to destroy several cubic metres of rock instantly. The advantage inherent in this weapon is its ability to adjust the power setting, something missing in the larger Tetryon Pulse Launcher.

NOTE: This Weapon is ONLY available on Combat oriented vessels and deep exploration ships.

Tetryon Pulse Launcher

A newly designed weapon for the use by Starfleet ground forces and security personnel, the Tetryon Pulse Launcher is perhaps the most powerful handheld weapon in Starfleet's arsenal. The device was designed as a single-person plasma cannon for use against small craft and heavily fortified emplacements. Building on the success of the Starfleet Avalon R&D facility to grow nearly flawless emitter crystals in a ground-based micro-gravity environment, the pulse launcher is effectively a miniaturized version of the pulse phaser used on newer Starships. Whilst much of this theoretical research has been applied to the Type-IIIb Pulse Compression rifle making it the first true transitional-phase accelerator, the Tetryon pulse launcher takes this a step further. As such, this weapon lacks the variety of power settings typical of a type-II or type-III phaser. When the trigger is depressed, the weapon fires a collimated beam of Tetryon particles which rebound from the target to the unit, providing range and vector information to the acquisition sub-systems. A rapid-discharge Sarium Krellide power cell, coupled with high-speed plasma accelerator coils and a ten-stage cascading pre-fire chamber allow for longer periods of sustained pulse fire than previous models of phasers, making it a truly automatic weapon. The discharge emerges as a focused pulse of superheated, rarefied plasma. The pulse launcher emits energy comparable to a Type IV phaser emitter and incorporates the biometric control systems now common to modern weapons systems. The weapon is capable of firing continuous or wide beam settings.

NOTE: This weapon is ONLY available on combat oriented vessel and deep explorations ships.

Grenades

Photon Grenades

Photon grenades are one of the most devastating personnel weapons developed by the Federation. Their use is strictly controlled, usually limited strictly to wartime conditions. They are effectively a more adjustable version of the microtorpedo used in modern fighter craft. Photon grenades may be set to explode upon impact, at some altitude above the ground, or at some preset time, up to ten hours after impact. Both the power level and blast radius of these weapons may also be carefully controlled. They have five distinct blast settings and a variable blast radius ranging from 3 to 10 meters.

Mass: 0.2 kg

Note: This weapon is limited in availability and use to wartime conditions or extreme combat zones and will be stocked only as mission conditions require.

Settings:

  1. Flash: All humanoids inside the blast radius without special eye protection are blinded for approximately five minutes.

  2. Heavy Stun: Stun all humans in blast radius for one hour.

  3. Heavy Thermal: Melts most metals in blast radius

  4. Light Disrupt: Vaporize all Humanoids and softer materials within the blast radius

  5. Heavy Disrupt/Explode: Any none shielded object is obliterated on contact. Shielded objects are severely damaged dependant upon size and power of shielding.

Armour

It is worth mentioning here that combat armour is use only by the Starfleet Marine corp. and large combat oriented Vessels such as the Maverick and Pendragon class. It is *not* standard issue and is used only in large scale Infantry combat missions or special operations missions.

The combat helmet is part of all marine battle dress. The helmet has an integral short-range communicator. It is also equipped with various sensors that allow night-vision, infrared scanning, magnification up to 5x, and a targeting interface with most Standard weapons from the Type III Pulse Compression Rifle Upwards.

Standard field combat dress consists of lightweight, reinforced ablative armour plating over a flexible mesh base. The plates affixed to the mesh cover arms, torso, and legs, with ridged joints to allow full freedom of movement. The armour is intended to provide protection against physical attacks, nullify most projectile weapons, and give some level of protection against low-level energy weapons or indirect hits from more powerful beam weapons. Direct hits from a phaser set to level five and higher will likely kill the wearer of standard combat dress and heavy stun will be effective when a direct hit is taken to torso or head. Note: larger field combat dress may be worn over a conventional vacuum suit and worn with a sealable helmet and gloves. This adds zero-atmosphere capabilities to the suit.

How Combat Works In STF

Brief Introduction To Turn Based Combat

In ages past the most popular form of role play combat was Turn Based, a system which allowed descriptive epic battles. The final ‘rules' for TB were settled in MSN role play years before it was closed down and they're good enough to be used in any situation and any role play system, including our own in STF.

The system described below comes from a very old document first written by a veteran role player named Jeff Allen and has been adapted for the purposes of this course.

Turn Based Role Playing Starfleet Style

TB means Turn Based, this means that each party gets two types of posts within their turn, a Defence post, and an Attack post. This makes for two in one single round as if it's being done in real life simultaneously. The defence post requires a defensive posted against the other party's attack, the attack post is the return attack.

Remember, just because a hit seems impossible to block, does not mean it is. GM's in STF are not out to kill you and short of you posting something truly ridiculous they will always give you a way out. The point of TB fighting is to post an attack that seems impossible to block but is not. It is your GM's job to figure out how to get out if it, if they can. GM's, as a rule are not permitted to put a player in an impossible position and will only cause direct damage to a character at the request of the player in question or as the result of a death notice being issued for actions committed that would invariably result in injury.

There are four golden rules that should be followed at all times when conducting combat In Character

  1. Never mod : moding is the term applied to anything that could be considered physically impossible. If you're a short athletic female Human security officer you're never going to be able to pick up an eight foot tall Klingon and hurl him across the room anymore than a six foot three 280lb male human security officer built like Sylvester Stallone is going to be able to outrun that same athletic female Security Officer. Moding also covers acts which could be considered impossible, e.g. you're trapped in a burning ship with no way to beam out and you step through an airlock into space to get back to your shuttle. These situations and others like them are the kind that will earn you death notices, which a GM issues when something impossible is attempted that would endanger the life of the Character in question. Three death notices result in the GM being granted the power to kill that Character and it is then the CO's prerogative to allow the player to return to the ship with another character or to remove them permanently from the roster.

  2. Never Use A God Character : We all know it's fun to be superhuman, ultra powered and completely untouchable, but let's face it, if you create a character like that no one is going to want to play with you, least of all the GM. I've seen it a number of times in STF and it's caused most of us grief at some point or other. If you aren't aware of the canon rules concerning Starfleet Officers then you should always feel free to ask any of the hundred or so experts in the club. Playing a genetically engineered super soldier Security Officer will not earn you any respect and will likely get you a flood of emails informing you that your character is impractical because Canon established in Deep Space Nine specifically states that genetically engineered beings were not permitted to enter Starfleet in any capacity, the sole exception being Doctor Julian Bashir, and only then because his father took the fall for committing the crime, and yes, it is a crime within the Federation. That is just one example, but I have seen some more extreme cases, even going so far as to create X-Men characters, arguing that there was a crossover book that gave them the right to play a Wolverine character. If you want to play that sort of character and your CO permits is then there's nothing that any of us can do to stop you short of complaining to the FComm, but bear in mind that no one will want to play with you if you do.

  3. Never Play Immortal Characters : It's fun and it gives you the satisfaction of knowing that you can walk the streets of an alien world and blast the species to hell, but again, no one will want to play with you. Remember that you must keep your characters reasonable and within canon rules otherwise you just sap the fun for others involved. Fortunately I've never actually seen an Immortal character in STF, and I fervently hope that I never do.

  4. Never Auto-Action : This is the act of posting something and assigning a response to another character. This is one of *the* biggest no-no's in STF. You never *ever* play the actions of another Character unless they are under your direct control (i.e. NE's). If you do this in combat you will likely earn the wrath of your GM and several rather lengthy email complaints from the players involved. If you post an attack that involves you, for example firing your phaser, you do not post whether the phaser hits it's intended target, you merely *attempt* to hit it. It's up to the owner of the Character you are firing at that will determine whether or not the phaser hits. If it is considered unlikely that you would miss then nine times out of ten the beam will strike, though occasionally, if you are fighting a PC Character they will argue this and it becomes the purview of the GM to judge the posts based on detail, quality and realism. Try to think of it like this, how would you feel If you were in a fight and your opponent posted that he blew a hole in your chest, killing you instantly?

One Final Word To The Wise

Always remember, you're permitted one attack and one defence section to each combat post, and this is for a reason. Consider that each post consists of about five to ten seconds of game time, during that time your Character will be able to do two things, defend and counterattack. I've seen people play out eight and more things in a single post, which gives the opponent no space in which to respond and will eventually take the fun out of combat, leaving you with that same, age old dilemma that no one wants to play with you.

Defend and Attack, that's all, remember those two words if you take nothing else from this course.

Other Branches Of The Service

Within STF there are a number of other Branches, some that are extrapolations from Canon and non Canon sources and some that are explained in a fair amount of Canon detail.

Marines

Marines are an interesting group that are only used on one ship, the U.S.S Endeavour in Fleet 5. There were no direct references to Marine units in any of the Star Trek series other than Enterprise in which they were used quite effectively as a Standard shipboard force. They have received passing nods in a number of episodes of the Next Generation and Deep Space Nine and would undoubtedly have been used as ground combat troops during the Dominion War. The specific rules governing Marines on the Endeavour can be obtained from the CO. They are a little too long winded to post directly in this course, but generally speaking Marine spots are only given to more experienced players because of the difficulty found in accurately portraying such a difficult field.

Intelligence

Intelligence is my personal favourite and my active COS characters both have Intelligence backgrounds, though it's also a sort of grey area, if you'll forgive the pun. The only active Intelligence position in STF is the swing position of Chief Intelligence Officer, which, like all swing positions is dependant upon the CO in question and is notoriously difficult to play. There have been a number of episode in Deep Space Nine and several that I can think of in The Next Generation dealing with Intelligence. Every Trek fan is familiar with the Section 31 storyline that ran through Deep Space Nine, though it is worth noting that not all Intelligence branches are quite so evil. CIO's generally have very little to do unless the sim in question has an Intelligence undertone, though it can be very rewarding and a lot of fun. If you choose an Intelligence related character it's a good idea to do a lot of research into the field in the 21st and 24th Centuries to help flesh them out. Remember though that having your character hail from Section 31 is highly unlikely as that is an organisation from which you do not leave lightly. If there are any specific questions about Intelligence theory, practice or Character development don't hesitate to contact me at andrewrobinson257@msn.com.

Tactical Officers

The position of Chief Tactical Officer is a swing position in STF, much like the CIO and Marine spots. The presence of a CTO on a vessel somewhat alters the position and responsibilities of the Chief of Security in the sense that the CTO becomes the officer primarily assigned to the Tactical station on a Starship Bridge. Tactical Officers are tasked with the ships combat operations and is generally only present on combat oriented vessels because of the nature of the position. In this situation Security Officers responsibilities no longer extend to ship to ship combat, as that's handled by the CTO. Obviously because of the limited scope of the characters duties it can be difficult to play a Tactical Officer and within STF the line between CTO and COS is often blurred by circumstance.

A Final Caution

Always remember that as a Security Officer you are not there to play god, you don't get to decide what you do or do not shoot, that's up to the Captain and your Chief of Security. You will spend 90% of your time not even carrying a phaser unless you serve aboard an Outpost or Starbase, and for that other 10% In Character you should concentrate on *not* using it.

Don't Go Overboard

Never go overboard with your Character. Don't give him every ability imaginable and don't make him preternaturally alert and accurate. All people have flaws, including Starfleet Officers, and in my experience it's usually those flaws that set us apart from everybody else. We're here to have fun, so give your Characters depth and colour, not shallow perfection and invulnerability.

Also, always work within the Starfleet framework. You don't get to torture a prisoner, that's a quick way to a court martial for your Character and an abbreviated tour of duty. You don't get to blow things to hell with Tetryon pulse launchers unless another war breaks out or you get sent on a mission that's guaranteed to need heavy firepower. Whilst it's pretty to look at weapons like that and it makes you look big and heavy to walk around armed like a tank you won't be carrying that Photon Mortar on your Promenade patrol.

Never Go Beyond Canon

There are literally hundreds of books out there, quite possibly even thousands that claim to be Star Trek, but are usually heavily outdated or inaccurate and use weapons and technology that have never even been hinted at in Canon, so just because you've read it in a book does not mean that you get to play Wolverine as a Security Officer. I'll be the first to admit that there are a stable of authors out there who write some absolutely brilliant works that do nothing short of enrich our knowledge of Trek technology and methodology, but bear in mind that most of what you read is Fan Fiction and doesn't go down well with the other members of the club when you try and use it.

Stick to Canon and the STF Reference Manual wherever possible. This isn't to say that you can't create your own technology. We're all for new designs and new specs for weapons, species and technologies, but ensure that you get them approved for use before you start, particularly with Weapons and Technology (which should be critiqued and approved by the Engineering Department/Research and Development Department).

Be Aware Of Your Ship Class

Above all else, before you lock and load, be aware of what ship you are stepping aboard. If you're looking to blow those alien scum to hell then you should be leaning more towards the larger classes such as Maverick and Pendragon that are more combat oriented. If you're looking for a rewarding time that will give you massive character development opportunities then head towards the Viking and Genesis class vessels. Personally, given the choice, I'd rather play a Science vessel any day because it gives you the opportunity to create characters of such rich history and realism that if you do finally take that step to the darker side of combat classes' people will find it a true pleasure to interact with you.

Exam

Submission Instructions

  1. Write out your answers to the questions below.

  2. E-mail them to the course proctor

  3. Be sure to include your full name at the top of the e-mail!

  4. Please copy the full question before placing your answer below it, this facilitates more rapid marking.

  5. Do not send your answers as an attachment. Send them in the body of the e-mail.

  6. Do not use "HTML-enriched" e-mail. It makes it harder to grade.

  7. All answers must be original. Do not simply copy and paste from the lessons.

  8. Be aware of the number in brackets next to each question, this is the number of marks awatded for each questions answered and will give you an idea of how long your answer should be.

  9. There is a theoretical total of 170 marks and the pass mark for this exam is 80%.

Section One (Worth a Total of 10 Marks)

  1. What is the primary role of a Starfleet Security officer? (1)

  2. What are the duties of a Starbase Security Officer? (3)

  3. Why is playing a Security Officer on a Science Vessel so difficult? (3)

  4. Why is it more important to remember what a Security Officer is when playing on a combat vessel than it is on any other type? (3)

Section Two (Worth a Total of 40 Marks)

Create a character using the guide layed out in Section two of the course. This character must be completely original and not one of your existing characters. Marks will be awarded for realism, spelling, grammar and presentation. Include the following in your bio:

  • Full Name (1)

  • Species (1)

  • Height (1)

  • Weight (1)

  • Eyes (1)

  • Hair (1)

  • Date Of Birth (1)

  • Place Of Birth (1)

  • Education (4)

  • Marital Status (1)

  • Parents (1)

  • Siblings (If Any)

  • Career Summary (5)

  • Background (15)

  • Medical History (6)

  • Psychological History (If Any)

Section Three (Worth a Total of 20 Marks)

  1. Describe a situation in which you would use hand weapons. (5)

  2. Describe a situation in which you would use rifles (5)

  3. Describe a situation in which you would use heavy weapons (5)

  4. Describe a situation in which you would use Armour and Grenades (5)

Section Four (Worth a Total of 20 Marks)

  1. Describe how to construct a TB combat post (5)

  2. Explain what moding is and why we shouldn't do it (5)

  3. Explain why we don't auto action other peoples characters (10)

Section Five (Worth a Total of 30 Marks)

  1. Explain in your own words and from your own viewpoint, the pro's and con's of playing a Marine (10)

  2. Explain in your own words and from your own viewpoint, the pro's and con's of playing an Intelligence Officer (10)

  3. Explain in your own words and from your own viewpoint, the pro's and con's of playing a Tactical Officer (10)

Section Six (Worth a Total of 20 Marks)

Write a brief summary of this section, in your own words and add a paragraph explaining your views on the opinions expressed within the section.

Final Question (Worth a Total of 30 Marks)

Below is a scenario in which you may find yourself. Write a brief outline of how you intend to resolve the situation and then create an In Character post following that plan. Marks will be awarded for realism, technical accuracy, spelling and grammar. For the purposes of this scenario you will act as your own GM and are free to play out anything that would require GM interaction. Bear in mind that there are a number of possible solutions to this scenario and you will not be judged for getting it ‘wrong', only for how well you handle the situation and how well you depict its resolution. Remember when you write out this answer what I have stressed time and time again about the role of a Security Officer.

You are Chief of Security aboard a Pendragon Class Cruiser and you are sent in to negotiate a truce between two warring civilisations, the P'mARt's and the Pring'mela. You beam down with a negotiations team to a secure site to conduct peace talks with the representatives of each race, but halfway through the talks a firefight erupts and half the representatives are killed. A rogue element of the P'mARt's military takes the Federation negotiators hostage, holding them in the negotiations room. The room has only one entrance and no ventilation system, it is in effect a large square stone box protected by a dampening field that prevents transporters from effecting them. The rogue soldiers threaten to kill the hostages unless negotiations cease. Outside of the room now both the P'mARt's and Pring'mela representatives urge you to assist them in resolving this situation and getting the negotiations back on track as they don't wish to see the cause of peace destroyed after so long at war.